Call Us Today: Cell in México: + 984-114-9761 | International cell for Whatsapps: + 811-414-7552

Isla Mujeres: The Greatest Whale Shark Aggregation On Earth

By in Articles with 0 Comments

1K5A8740-Edit-1024x682

Reporting From Blue Playa Real Estate in Playa del Carmen, Sales Professionals that make buying a home an amazing experience.

Located in the Caribbean Sea just off the northeastern tip of the Yucatan Peninsula, the waters of Isla Mujeres continue to play host to hundreds of whale sharks each year, in a phenomenon that scientists now think has been taking place for many years, despite its relatively recent scientific discovery in 2009.

In 2009, aerial images of the waters near the Mexican island of Isla Mujeres showed an expanse of clear, aquamarine blue flecked with hundreds of tiny brown dashes. On closer inspection, the dashes morphed into whale sharks, and the images provided photographic evidence of the largest aggregation ever recorded. That summer, a record 420 whale sharks were seen during a single flight, all within an area of just 11 square miles. Although whale-shark aggregations had been recorded elsewhere in the world, including in Mozambique, the Maldives, Honduras and Australia, the previous record was no more than a few dozen animals at once.

maldivespillowtalk_3259740b

Located in the Caribbean Sea just off the northeastern tip of the Yucatan Peninsula, the waters of Isla Mujeres continue to play host to hundreds of whale sharks each year, in a phenomenon that scientists now think has been taking place for many years, despite its relatively recent scientific discovery in 2009.

The whale sharks arrive in the area each year in early May and stay until mid-September. They are not the first whale shark aggregation to be recorded in the area; nearby Cabo Catoche also plays host to an annual gathering of the giant sharks, although in far fewer numbers. While the Cabo Catoche whale sharks come to feed on crustacean zooplankton in shallow, green water close to shore, the Isla Mujeres whale sharks are found in deep, blue water 20 to 30 miles away from the island. They are drawn there by the mass spawning of the little tunny, the most common tuna in the Atlantic Ocean, and spend the summer months voraciously feeding off the transparent fish eggs that coat the surface of the sea. Large numbers of manta rays, golden eagle rays, sailfish and even marlin join the whale sharks in the feast. Because this second, much larger concentration of whale sharks takes place further out to sea, local fishermen have given these whale sharks the collective name Afuera, or ‘outside’ in Spanish. For a long time, the fishermen were the only ones who knew about the Isla Mujeres sharks, until one of them mentioned the phenomenon to shark scientist Robert Hueter in 2002.

ss

In 2009, aerial images of the waters near the Mexican island of Isla Mujeres showed an expanse of clear, aquamarine blue flecked with hundreds of tiny brown dashes. On closer inspection, the dashes morphed into whale sharks, and the images provided photographic evidence of the largest aggregation ever recorded. That summer, a record 420 whale sharks were seen during a single flight, all within an area of just 11 square miles. Although whale-shark aggregations had been recorded elsewhere in the world, including in Mozambique, the Maldives, Honduras and Australia, the previous record was no more than a few dozen animals at once.

Located in the Caribbean Sea just off the northeastern tip of the Yucatan Peninsula, the waters of Isla Mujeres continue to play host to hundreds of whale sharks each year, in a phenomenon that scientists now think has been taking place for many years, despite its relatively recent scientific discovery in 2009.

The whale sharks arrive in the area each year in early May and stay until mid-September. They are not the first whale shark aggregation to be recorded in the area; nearby Cabo Catoche also plays host to an annual gathering of the giant sharks, although in far fewer numbers. While the Cabo Catoche whale sharks come to feed on crustacean zooplankton in shallow, green water close to shore, the Isla Mujeres whale sharks are found in deep, blue water 20 to 30 miles away from the island. They are drawn there by the mass spawning of the little tunny, the most common tuna in the Atlantic Ocean, and spend the summer months voraciously feeding off the transparent fish eggs that coat the surface of the sea. Large numbers of manta rays, golden eagle rays, sailfish and even marlin join the whale sharks in the feast. Because this second, much larger concentration of whale sharks takes place further out to sea, local fishermen have given these whale sharks the collective name Afuera, or ‘outside’ in Spanish. For a long time, the fishermen were the only ones who knew about the Isla Mujeres sharks, until one of them mentioned the phenomenon to shark scientist Robert Hueter in 2002.

Whale_shark_Georgia_aquarium

The whale shark is considered Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List and, as a species, needs all the help it can get. If conducted properly, the successful whale-shark tourism industry on Isla Mujeres and Isla Holbox could be a key to these magnificent animals’ conservation, as the acknowledgment of their financial worth will encourage both local and federal governments to enact protections.

Come to live in Playa del Carmen and enjoy of these amazing moments. Check all our properties for sale in Playa del Carmen here !

Share This
About The Author

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *